Suit-Up and Button-down: Sgt. Coombs Royal Sappers and Miners Uniform Jacket

Artefeature by Fan L.

The artifact “Sergeant Joseph Coombs, Royal Sappers and Miners” was worn between 1826 and 1832. It is now on exhibit at the BYTOWN MUSEUM in Ottawa. It is a red wool military uniform jacket of the Royal Sappers and Miners. According to BYTOWN MUSEUM’s artifact database, Minisis, “It is complete with black collar, cuffs, epaulettes and chevrons, all trimmed in gold braiding. The short wool waist jacket has split tails, beige wool lining and a single row of brass uniform buttons as well as hook and eye fasteners on the collar. Epaulettes are tied on at the outside of the shoulder and are secured with hook and eye fasteners at the neck.”

M107
Royal Sappers and Miners Uniform Jacket worn by Sergeant Joseph Coombs, 1820-1830, wool & brass. Image courtesy of the BYTOWN MUSEUM, M107.

Some people might wonder why there appears to be slashes across the front of the jacket. Maybe it was caused by a sword? On June 25th 2000, Kyla Ubbink, conservator, visited the BYTOWN MUSEUM and inspected this artifact. She wrote in the condition report, “There are six black marks in a diagonal line found on the front property at the left breast, probably caused by a leather strap.” The leather strap she was referring to was likely from the white leather ‘bandolier’, which hung across the front of the Royal Sappers and Miners Uniforms. The discolouration on Sergeant Coombs jacket was probably not caused by a sword at all, but by a leather bandolier.

P314_1_Bytown
The portrait of Sergeant Joseph Coombs. Portrait courtesy of the BYTOWN MUSEUM, P314.

 

 

Joseph Coombs was a member of 15th company of Colonel John By’s Royal Sappers and Miners who arrived on June 1st, 1827. In the same year, he initially chose to take his discharge to England. But he had second thoughts and returned to Canada with his wife Ann, where he became Bytown’s first druggist, built the town’s first frame house at 351 Rideau Street, and helped organize the first regular fire company in Bytown.

P312_1_Bytown
The house of Sergeant Joseph Coombs, built c. 1827. Image courtesy of the BYTOWN MUSEUM, P312.

When the Rideau Canal was completed, Coombs took his discharge from the army and left his uniform in a trunk in the attic of his frame house in Bytown.

For the Bytown Museum to have an army uniform is very rare because before the middle of the 19th century, it was public property. This artifact contributes greatly to the study of the Royal Sappers and Miners, as they served in Ottawa, in the mid-19th century.

 

Fan L. is an international student who is from Xi’an in China, now currently a secondary language EAP program student at Carleton University. He will be expected to get into Bachelor of Social Work in this upcoming May. He joined YoCo not only because of his desire to learn more about the capital city of this fascinating country, but also to gain volunteering experience for his future life. He has a strong hope of helping everybody who needs help. Fan is a committed volunteer who is curious about the things he will confront in the future!


Préparez-vous et boutonnez-vous : Veste d’uniforme du sergent Coombs, du Régiment royal des sapeurs et mineurs

Artefeature par Fan L.

Le sergent  Joseph Coombs, du Régiment royal des sapeurs et mineurs, a porté cet artefact entre 1826 et 1832. La veste, pièce d’uniforme militaire en laine rouge, est aujourd’hui exposée au MUSÉE BYTOWN à Ottawa. Selon la base de données du Musée, Minisis, cet artefact « comporte un col noir, des poignets, des épaulettes et des galons ornés de passements d’or.  Cette veste à taille courte doublée de laine beige possède une rangée unique de boutons d’uniforme en laiton et des agrafes à crochet et à œillet sur le col. Les épaulettes, fixées à l’extérieur de l’épaule, sont retenues au col par les agrafes. »

M107
Veste d’uniforme du Régiment royal des sapeurs et mineurs portée par le sergent Joseph Coombs, 1820-1830, laine et laiton. Avec l’aimable permission du MUSÉE BYTOWN MUSEUM, M107. 

Certains se demanderont peut-être d’où viennent les traces obliques visibles à l’avant de la veste. Ont-elles été causées par une épée? Le 25 juin 2000, la restauratrice Kyla Ubbink a visité le MUSÉE BYTOWN et examiné cet artefact. Dans son rapport sur l’état de la pièce, elle relève « six marques noires en diagonale sur le devant de la veste, à la poitrine, du côté gauche, probablement causées par une sangle de cuir. » Il s’agit sans doute de la bandoulière de cuir blanc qui faisait partie de l’uniforme du Régiment des sapeurs et des mineurs. Ainsi, la décoloration survenue sur la veste du sergent Coombs n’a probablement pas été causée par une épée, mais par la sangle en cuir d’une bandoulière.

P314_1_Bytown
Portrait du sergent Joseph Coombs. Avec l’aimable permission du MUSÉE BYTOWN, P314.

Membre de la 15e Compagnie du Régiment des sapeurs et mineurs que commande le colonel John By, Joseph Coombs arrive à Ottawa le 1er juin 1827. Plus tôt cette même année, il avait décidé de mettre fin à son service en Angleterre. Mais il se ravise et, revenant au Canada avec sa femme Ann, il devient le premier apothicaire de Bytown,  construit la première maison à ossature de la ville au 351 de la rue Rideau, et aide à organiser le premier corps de pompiers de Bytown.

P312_1_Bytown
La maison du sergent Joseph Coombs, construite vers 1827. Avec l’aimable permission du MUSÉE BYTOWN, P312.

Une fois la construction du canal Rideau achevée, Coombs quitte l’armée et range son uniforme dans un coffre placé dans le grenier de sa maison à charpente de Bytown.

Le Musée Bytown a la chance exceptionnelle de posséder un uniforme militaire, ce qui est très rare car avant le milieu du xixe siècle, les uniformes sont propriété publique. Cet artefact a permis d’approfondir nos connaissances sur le Régiment des sapeurs et mineurs, qui a servi à Ottawa au milieu du xixe siècle.

 

Originaire de Xi’an, en Chine, Fan L. est un étudiant international inscrit actuellement au programme d’anglais langue seconde de la Carleton University consacré à l’étude de la langue à des fins universitaires. Il espère s’inscrire au baccalauréat en travail social en mai prochain. Il s’est joint au Conseil des jeunes parce qu’il désire approfondir ses connaissances sur la capitale de ce pays fascinant, mais aussi pour accroître son expérience de bénévolat. Il espère fortement apporter de l’aide à tous ceux qui en ont besoin. Fan est un bénévole engagé curieux de tout ce qu’il aura à affronter dans l’avenir!

Stepping Up to the Plate: Parliament Fire of 1916 Commemorative Souvenir

Artefeature by Delany L.

Included in the Museum’s new special exhibition, “Forged in Fire: The Building and Burning of Parliament” is a dainty white plate with a blue design showing the Parliament Buildings, including the original Victoria Tower which was destroyed in the fire of 1916.

Photo 1
Source: Ebay.com

The reverse of the plate shows the Johnson Brothers maker’s mark, a company from England, with whom many professional and amateur antique collectors may be familiar due to their lengthy period of production.

Photo 3
Source: Ebay.com

Founded in 1883 by Frederick and Alfred Johnson, the goal of the Staffordshire pottery company was to produce an earthenware called “White Granite,” which was great for dinnerware because it resembled china but was as tough as ironstone. However, it was not the product for which the brothers would become best known.

By 1888, elder brother, Henry had joined the company, which produced its wares in a factory called the Charles Street Works in Stoke-on-Trent, as well as at two other facilities nearby.    By the end of the century, a fourth brother, Robert joined the company with a satellite office in New York. The number of Johnson Brothers potteries had jumped to five, and the product for which they would become most famous, “transferware”, was added to the line.

Photo 4
Some examples of Johnson Brothers transferware ‘Old Britain Castles’ in Brown Multi, source: shabbyfrenchcottage.com

The plate showing the Parliament Buildings is believed to have been produced before the infamous fire, and the squared-corner crown marking on the back is consistent with items made in the teens and early 1920s. It thus originates either from shortly before or after the fire, possibly to commemorate the buildings that were lost.

The company experienced considerable success in both Europe and North America due to their high quality products and mid-range pricing. During the Great Depression, it modernized its production in hopes of a brighter future, and after World War II they remained especially popular with the Friendly Village pattern and also with Christmas plates. By the 1950s, popular patterns were in the bold mid-century modern style- a major change from their original aesthetic.

Photo 5
Cups and saucers in the mid-century modern style, Source: Etsy.com

Finally, in 1968, the company was unable to remain independent any longer and merged with the Wedgwood Group. One of the symbols of household goods in the late nineteenth century and most of the twentieth, Johnson Brothers products can still be found in many cupboards today.

To see the plate and learn more about the fire of 1916, visit the “Forged in Fire” exhibit at the Bytown Museum until October 31, 2016!

 

Though not an Ottawa native herself, Delany developed a love for the city while studying history at uOttawa. Now in her third year, she is excited to see her passions for blogging, history, and volunteering combine in her new role as a member of YoCo. When she’s not doing any of those things, she enjoys reading, classic film, cats, and shopping.


Le nez dans l’assiette : Souvenirs de l’incendie du Parlement de 1916

Artefeature par Delany L.

La nouvelle exposition spéciale du Musée, Façonnés par le feu : les édifices du Parlement, présente entre autres une délicate assiette blanche ornée d’un motif bleu représentant les édifices du Parlement, dont la tour Victoria originale, détruite par l’incendie de 1916.

Photo 1
Source: Ebay.com

À l’endos de l’assiette se trouve l’estampille du fabricant Johnson Brothers, une entreprise anglaise qui a longtemps été en activité, bien connue de plusieurs collectionneurs d’antiquités amateurs ou professionnels.

Photo 3
Source: Ebay.com

Fondée en 1883 par Frederick et Alfred Johnson, l’entreprise de poterie du Staffordshire devait produire une céramique appelée « granit blanc », idéale pour la vaisselle car elle ressemblait à de la porcelaine tout en ayant la solidité du grès ferrugineux. Cependant, les deux frères ne doivent pas leur célébrité à ce produit.

En 1888, Henry, le frère aîné, se joint à l’entreprise qui fabrique sa vaisselle dans une usine située rue Charles, à Stoke‑on‑Trent, ainsi que dans deux autres installations voisines. À la fin du siècle, Robert, un quatrième frère, se joint à l’entreprise et ouvre un bureau satellite à New York. Le nombre d’articles produits par l’entreprise quintuple, et celle-ci lance la gamme d’articles qui la rendra célèbre, la vaisselle décorée au moyen d’impression par transfert.

Photo 4
Vaisselle ornée au moyen d’impression par transfert de « vieux châteaux britanniques », shabbyfrenchcottage.com

On pense que l’assiette représentant les édifices du Parlement a été produite avant le tragique incendie. L’estampille en forme de couronne au coin carré imprimée à l’arrière correspond aux articles produits dans les années 1910 et au début des années 1920. Les assiettes ont donc été fabriquées peu avant ou peu après l’incendie, peut-être pour commémorer les édifices détruits.

L’entreprise a connu un vif succès en Europe comme en Amérique du Nord grâce à la grande qualité de ses produits et à ses prix situés dans une échelle intermédiaire. Pendant la Crise de 1929, elle a modernisé sa production dans l’espoir d’un avenir meilleur, et après la Seconde Guerre mondiale, le motif de village accueillant et les assiettes de Noël ont été particulièrement appréciés. Dans les années 1950, les dessins les plus populaires empruntaient un style moderne audacieux, contrastant avec l’esthétique des motifs d’origine.

Photo 5
Tasses et soucoupes au style moderne du milieu du siècle, Etsy.com

Enfin, en 1968, incapable de conserver son indépendance, l’entreprise fusionne avec le Wedgwood Group. Symboles des articles de maison à la fin du xixe siècle et pendant une bonne partie du xxe siècle, les produits de la Johnson Brothers garnissent encore plusieurs placards d’aujourd’hui.

Pour voir les assiettes et vous informer au sujet de l’incendie de 1916, visitez l’exposition Façonnés par le feu, à l’affiche au Musée Bytown jusqu’au 31 décembre 2016!

Bien qu’elle ne soit pas née à Ottawa, Delany a adopté la ville lorsqu’elle a commencé à étudier l’histoire à l’Université d’Ottawa. Elle est inscrite en 3e année, et elle est ravie que son nouveau rôle de membre du Conseil des jeunes lui permette de combiner sa passion pour les blogues, l’histoire et le bénévolat. En‑dehors de ces activités, elle aime la lecture, les films classiques, les chats et le magasinage.

Souvenirs of the Past: Ottawa’s Great Fire of 1900

Artefeature by Jessie L.

Canadians may be familiar with the burning of the Centre Block of Parliament on February 3, 1916; however many are less aware that this fire was not the first to causes memorable destruction in the country’s capital. In fact, Ottawa has had a history of tragic fires. One of the most tragic incidents being the Great Fire of 1900, whose devastation was captured and memorialized in the form of  the “Big Fire of 1900” souvenir picture book.

P2778_001_Bytown_crop
BYTOWN MUSEUM, P1604

On April 26, 1900 a small roof fire across the Ottawa River in Hull, Quebec, caught fire and spread to the surrounding buildings; within a few hours the fire had engulfed half of Hull’s downtown area including the E. B. Eddy mill and the Hull Lumber Company. By 1:00 pm all attempts to control the blaze had failed and the wind had carried the fire across the Chaudiere Falls to the Ottawa area. The proximity of lumber yards, wood piles and mills to the Ottawa River allowed the fire to spread with ease. By the evening the fire had devastated Lebreton Flats and the surrounding neighbourhoods of Rochesterville (now the neighbourhoods around Preston Street) and Bayswater. Many eyewitness accounts state that buildings had been leveled from Booth Street all the way to the C.P.R rail line.

P2778_013_Bytown_crop
BYTOWN MUSEUM, P1604
P2778_006_Bytown_crop.jpg
BYTOWN MUSEUM, P1604

The aftermath of the fire left seven people dead and 1500 homeless. However the death toll would rise due to the spread of disease to those forced to live in crowded tents after they were left homeless. One fifth of Ottawa had been destroyed and damages were approximated to the value of $6,200,000 in Ottawa, and $3,300,000 in Hull. Large relief efforts were raised from around the world but even with this support it would still take years to fully rebuild the homes and industries that were reduced to rubble in the Great Fire of 1900.

Souvenir picture books like the one made to commemorate the Great Fire of 1900, were a part of a larger trend in the late Victorian era. As photography technology was developing and becoming cheaper to access and mass produce, postcards and souvenir books were created to promote tourism and to commemorate different events including tragedies. Therefore, this souvenir picture book both acts as a tool for commemoration of one of Ottawa’s great tragedies but also demonstrates a greater trend in Victorian Canada.

The survival of documents such as the “Big Fire of 1900” souvenir picture book gives Canadians a visual insight into the devastation that faced the capital at the turn of the century. These books also provide a unique example of Victorian souvenir practices at a time when these practices were beginning to be widely circulated throughout the world. Consequently, due to this Victorian trend, the memory of Ottawa’s great fire has been captured in a way that truly eternalizes the tragedy and devastation that forever changed Ottawa’s history.

P2778_014_Bytown_crop
BYTOWN MUSEUM, P1604

Jessie is a student at the University of Ottawa working towards completing her last year of undergraduate studies in History and Political Science. As a new member the Youth Council, Jessie hopes to share her passion for Ottawa’s history while engaging in fun and interactive ways of educating youth about local history. In her spare time Jessie loves to explore Ottawa through participating in the city’s many festivals and historic events.


 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Souvenirs du passé : L’incendie qui a ravagé Ottawa en 1900

Artefeature par Jessie L.

Les Canadiens ont souvent entendu parler de l’incendie qui a détruit l’édifice du Centre au Parlement, le 3 février 1916. Cependant, plusieurs ignorent que ce feu n’est pas le premier qui ait détruit de façon mémorable la capitale du pays. De fait, Ottawa a subi plusieurs incendies dramatiques. Celui de 1900, dont le souvenir est immortalisé dans l’album intitulé Photo Views of the Big Fire, se classe parmi les plus grandes tragédies.

P2778_001_Bytown_crop
MUSÉE BYTOWN, P1604

Le 26 avril 1900, un petit incendie, qui a éclaté sur un toit à Hull, au Québec, de l’autre côté de la rivière des Outaouais, se propage dans les bâtiments alentours. En quelques heures, le feu détruit la moitié du centre-ville de Hull, y compris l’entreprise papetière E.B. Eddy et la Hull Lumber Company. À 13 h, toutes les tentatives de maîtriser les flammes ont échoué et le vent transporte les braises par delà la chute des Chaudières, jusque dans la région d’Ottawa. La proximité de cours à bois, de piles de bois et de scieries alimente le feu qui se propage facilement. Dans la soirée, l’incendie a dévasté les plaines LeBreton et les quartiers environnants de Rochesterville (secteur actuel situé autour de la rue Preston) et de Bayswater. Plusieurs témoins oculaires ont raconté que les édifices se sont effondrés depuis la rue Booth jusqu’à la voie du Chemin de fer Canadien Pacifique.

P2778_013_Bytown_crop
MUSÉE BYTOWN, P1604

L’incendie a causé sept morts et laissé 1 500 personnes sans abri. Cependant, le nombre de décès s’accroît en raison des maladies qui se répandent parmi les personnes forcées de vivre en grand nombre dans des tentes, une fois leur maison détruite. Près du cinquième de la ville d’Ottawa est détruit, et on évalue les dommages à environ 6 200 000 $ à Ottawa, et à 3 300 000 $ à Hull. Partout dans le monde, d’importants efforts d’aide sont déployés, mais il faudra plusieurs années avant de rebâtir toutes les maisons et industries réduites en ruines lors du grand incendie de 1900.

P2778_006_Bytown_crop
MUSÉE BYTOWN, P1604

Les livres souvenirs illustrés comme celui réalisé pour commémorer l’incendie de 1900 relèvent d’une tendance plus vaste courante à la fin de l’époque victorienne. Comme la photographie se développe, devient moins coûteuse et est produite en série, on crée des cartes postales et des livres souvenirs pour promouvoir le tourisme et commémorer divers événements, dont des tragédies. Ainsi, ce livre souvenir a servi d’outil pour commémorer l’un des plus grands drame survenu à Ottawa, mais il témoigne aussi d’un grand courant qui existait à l’époque victorienne au Canada. La survivance de documents comme Photo Views of the Big Fire donne aux Canadiens un aperçu visuel de la catastrophe subie par la capitale au tournant du siècle. Ces ouvrages offrent également un exemple unique des pratiques victoriennes au moment où celles‑ci commencent à circuler dans le monde entier. En conséquence, grâce à cette mode victorienne, on a capté le souvenir du grand incendie d’Ottawa afin d’immortaliser la tragédie et la catastrophe qui ont à jamais changé l’histoire d’Ottawa.

P2778_014_Bytown_crop
MUSÉE BYTOWN, P1604

Jessie étudie à l’Université d’Ottawa. Elle termine sa dernière année d’études de premier cycle en histoire et en science politique. Nouvelle membre du Conseil des jeunes, Jessie espère partager sa passion de l’histoire d’Ottawa tout en renseignant les jeunes sur l’histoire locale de façon amusante et interactive. Pendant ses temps de loisir, Jessie aime explorer la ville en participant à ses multiples festivals et événements historiques.

In Memoriam: The Death Hand of Thomas D’Arcy McGee

Artefeature by Serena Y.

This death hand (pictured below) belongs to the Honourable Thomas D’Arcy McGee, MP for Montreal West in the House of Commons of Canada. An Irishman and Father of Confederation, McGee advocated for Irish co-operation with the British in Canada. McGee’s stance on this issue alienated some of his fellow Irish Catholics; and the Fenians, a radical Irish group, considered him a traitor.

On April 7, 1868, Thomas D’Arcy McGee was assassinated outside his lodgings at Mrs. Trotter’s boarding house on Sparks Street. Having returned from a debate in Parliament that went on past midnight, he was shot in the head by an unknown assailant. Patrick J. Whelan, a suspected Fenian sympathizer, was subsequently convicted and hanged for the crime on February 11, 1869.

In the Victorian era, death masks were a common means of remembering the deceased. As McGee had been shot in the head, this plaster cast of his hand was taken instead, shortly after his death. As a public servant and Father of Confederation, McGee was given a state funeral. Over 80,000 people attended his funeral procession in Montreal, almost 80% of its population at that time.

BT hand fixed
Thomas D’Arcy McGee’s death hand, taken shortly after his assassination in April of 1868. As McGee was a gifted orator in the House of Commons, this impression of his hand is a symbol of the skill with which he penned his Parliamentary speeches. Courtesy of BYTOWN MUSEUM, N65.

The BYTOWN MUSEUM acquired McGee’s death hand in 1920. It is currently on display on the third floor of the museum, with other artefacts pertaining to Canada’s political history. Come visit the BYTOWN MUSEUM to discover more about Thomas D’Arcy McGee and his lasting legacy in Canada.

Serena is a student at the University of Ottawa in History and English Literature. An advocate for the preservation of local history, Serena volunteered at Fort York National Historic Site in Toronto, for the bicentennial of the War of 1812. After moving to Ottawa, she joined the Bytown Youth Council to help promote Ottawa’s history. She enjoys reading, writing and exploring the city, where there’s always something new to discover!

 


In memoriam: la main mortuaire de Thomas D’Arcy McGee

Artefeature par Serena Y.

La main mortuaire illustrée ci‑dessous appartient à l’honorable Thomas D’Arcy McGee, député à la Chambre des communes du Canada pour Montréal‑Ouest. Cet Irlandais père de la Confédération a soutenu la collaboration des Irlandais avec le Canada britannique. Sa position lui a aliéné certains de ses compatriotes catholiques; et les féniens, groupe de radicaux irlandais, le considéraient comme un traître.

Le 7 avril 1868, Thomas D’Arcy McGee est assassiné à l’extérieur de la pension de Mme Trotter où il loge, rue Sparks. Tandis qu’il revient d’une séance parlementaire qui s’est poursuivie jusque passé minuit, un assaillant inconnu lui tire une balle dans la tête.  Patrick J. Whelan, qu’on soupçonne être un sympathisant fénien, est par la suite accusé du meurtre et pendu le 11 février 1869.

À l’époque victorienne, on réalisait souvent des masques mortuaires à la mémoire des défunts. Comme McGee a reçu une balle dans la tête, on a plutôt fait ce moule de plâtre de sa main, peu après sa mort. À titre de fonctionnaire et de père de la Confédération, McGee a eu droit à des funérailles officielles. Plus de 80 000 personnes ont assisté à Montréal au cortège funèbre, soit 80 p. cent de la population d’alors.

BT hand fixed
Main mortuaire de Thomas D’Arcy McGee, réalisée peu après son assassinat en avril 1868. Parce qu’il était un orateur doué à la Chambre des communes, ce plâtre moulé sur sa main symbolise son talent à rédiger des discours parlementaires. Avec l’aimable autorisation du MUSÉE BYTOWN, N65.

Le MUSÉE BYTOWN a acquis la main mortuaire de McGee en 1920. Elle est actuellement exposée au 3e étage du Musée, avec d’autres artefacts témoignant de l’histoire politique du Canada. Venez visiter le MUSÉE BYTOWN et renseignez‑vous sur Thomas D’Arcy McGee et le legs durable qu’il a laissé au Canada.

Serena étudie l’histoire et la littérature anglaise à l’Université d’Ottawa. Engagée dans la préservation de l’histoire locale, elle a fait du bénévolat à Fort-York, un lieu historique national situé à Toronto, à l’occasion du 200e anniversaire de la guerre de 1812. Une fois installée à Ottawa, elle s’est jointe au Conseil des jeunes du Musée Bytown pour aider à promouvoir l’histoire d’Ottawa. Elle aime lire, écrire et explorer la ville où elle découvre toujours quelque chose de nouveau!

Stick’em with the Pointy End: The Hypodermic Syringe

Artefeature by Lilia L.

It is one of the most ubiquitous medical tools – and one of the most feared. Yes, the hypodermic syringe! Few of us enjoy that familiar pinprick feeling, but it can’t be denied that the hypodermic syringe is invaluable. Its name is derived from its ability to reach under (hypo) the skin (dermis), as the contents of the syringe travel down a hollow needle and into the body. It allows us to directly inject medications and vaccines and to easily take blood samples.

artefeature img1 (3)
This 1869 illustration is from the Manual of Hypodermic Medication by Roberts Bartholow. Bartholow instructs: “Take up between the thumb and forefinger of the left hand a loose fold of skin in some convenient situation. Push in the needle with a quick and decided motion, at a right angle to the direction of the fold…The injection must be made slowly, drop by drop, so that the fluid may diffuse itself…” Source: https://archive.org/details/manualofhypoderm00bart.

So who can we thank for this medical ‘frienemy’? The Victorians, specifically Dr. Alexander Wood. Medication was commonly administered orally, and many doctors were trying to develop a more efficient and localized treatment method. Experimentation with hypodermic procedures had been going on since the 1600s. However, it wasn’t until 1855 that a breakthrough was publicized, when the Scottish Dr. Wood described his success using a hypodermic syringe and needle to inject “a solution of muriate of morphia” to treat an elderly lady’s pain. By the 1860s the hypodermic syringe had entered the toolkits of doctors throughout Europe and North America – including here in Ottawa, as we can see from this awesome BYTOWN MUSEUM artefact.

I199_2_Bytown crop full
It was initially believed that injections had to be made at the site of the pain or illness being treated, but Dr. Charles Hunter demonstrated that medication could be injected at any location and still be effective. However, early usage of the hypodermic syringe still had drawbacks: few drugs were injectable, and lack of sterilization of needles between uses resulted in cross-contamination between patients. Source: BYTOWN MUSEUM, I199 a-d.

This handy portable case lined with satin and velvet holds a vial, a syringe, and a needle; the empty groove above the syringe suggests that the set also contained a second needle. Today’s syringes are usually plastic with a stainless steel hypodermic needle, but early ones were made of a variety of materials like glass, metal, leather, and rubber. This particular set features a practical and popular combination, as metal components were more durable while the glass still allowed doctors to see what was happening. Before entering the museum’s collection, the hypodermic syringe was used at the County of Carleton Protestant General Hospital (which later became the Ottawa Civic Hospital).

artefeature img3 (3)
The female medical ward at the County of Carleton General Protestant Hospital, ca. 1900. The BYTOWN MUSEUM’s hypodermic syringe was used by a doctor at this institution. Source: Item CA-019997, http://ottawa.ca/en/1870s-1940s.

Lilia is graduating this spring from the University of Ottawa, with an honours degree in History and a minor in Political Science. This is her third year on YoCo, and she is excited for the historical discoveries this year will bring.


Rentrez-la du côté pointu : la seringue hypodermique

Artefeature par Lilia L.

La seringue hypodermique est l’un des instruments médicaux les plus répandus et dont le plus de gens ont peur! Peu d’entre nous aimons cette sensation familière de piqûre, mais nous ne pouvons nier l’importance de la seringue. Son nom signifie « en-dessous de » (hypo) et peau (derme). Son contenu traverse une aiguille creuse pour être introduit sous la peau. La seringue permet ainsi d’injecter directement dans le corps des substances médicamenteuses et des vaccins ou d’extraire des échantillons de sang.

artefeature img1 (3)
Cette illustration de 1869 provient du Manual of Hypodermic Medication de Roberts Bartholow, qui donne les instructions suivantes : « Pincer un pli de la peau entre le pouce et l’index de la main gauche de façon confortable. Entrer l’aiguille d’un mouvement rapide et décidé, en angle droit par rapport au pli […] L’injection doit être donnée lentement, goutte par goutte, afin que le liquide se diffuse […] » Source : https://archive.org/details/manualofhypoderm00bart
À qui doit‑on cet « ami-ennemi » médical ? Aux gens de l’époque victorienne, plus précisément au Dr Alexander Wood. Jusque-là, on administrait les médicaments par voie orale, et plusieurs médecins tentaient d’élaborer des méthodes plus efficaces et plus localisées. On effectue des expériences de traitement hypodermique depuis les années 1600. Cependant, c’est en 1855 qu’une percée majeure voit le jour, lorsque le Dr Wood, un médecin écossais, décrit l’utilisation réussie d’une seringue hypodermique pour injecter « une solution de muriate de morphine » à une patiente âgée souffrante. Dès les années 1860, la seringue hypodermique fait partie des trousses des médecins de toute l’Europe et de l’Amérique du Nord, y compris d’Ottawa, comme en témoigne ce superbe artefact du MUSÉE BYTOWN.

I199_2_Bytown crop full
Au début, on croit qu’il faut pratiquer l’injection à l’endroit même de la douleur ou de la maladie, mais le Dr Charles Hunter démontre que la médication peut être introduite n’importe où et demeurer efficace. Cependant, les premières utilisations de la seringue hypodermique comportent des inconvénients : peu de médicaments sont injectables, et l’absence de stérilisation des aiguilles conduit à une contamination croisée entre patients. Source : MUSÉE BYTOWN, I199 a-d.

Cette trousse portable pratique doublée de velours et de satin contient une fiole, une seringue et une aiguille; la cavité vide au‑dessus de la seringue suggère que la trousse contenait une seconde aiguille. Aujourd’hui, les seringues sont surtout en plastique et l’aiguille, en acier inoxydable, mais les premières seringues étaient faites en divers matériaux dont le verre, le métal, le cuir et le caoutchouc. Cet ensemble‑ci offre une combinaison pratique et populaire, car les éléments en métal sont plus durables tandis que le verre permet aux médecins de voir ce qui se passe. Avant de faire partie de la collection du Musée, cette seringue hypodermique a été utilisée au County of Carleton Protestant General Hospital (qui deviendra l’Ottawa Civic Hospital).

artefeature img3 (3)
Le pavillon des femmes du County of Carleton Protestant General Hospital, vers 1900. Un médecin de cette institution a utilisé la seringue hypodermique du MUSÉE BYTOWN. Source : article CA 019997, http://ottawa.ca/fr/residents/arts-culture-et-communaute/musees-et-patrimoine/1870s-1940s [page consultée le 20 mars 2016].
Lilia sera diplômée ce printemps de l’Université d’Ottawa. Elle prépare un baccalauréat en histoire avec mineure en science politique. C’est son troisième mandat comme membre du Conseil, et elle est impatiente de voir sur quelles découvertes historiques elle lèvera le voile cette année.

Burning Questions: The Fire of Parliament 1916

By Serena Y.

Today marks the 100th anniversary of the Fire of Parliament, which occurred on February 3rd, 1916. Serena, a YoCo member, interviewed Grant Vogl, Collections and Exhibitions Manager. They discussed the history of the hill, the cause of the fire, and the rebuilding of Parliament, featured in the MUSÉE BYTOWN MUSEUM’s new temporary exhibition, “Forged in Fire: The Building and Burning of Parliament”.


Serena Y: First off, can you tell us about the Fire of Parliament, 1916?

Grant Vogl: In simple terms, it was devastating. Here you have the main administrative building of the Federal Government of Canada totally gutted and destroyed; a major event both for Ottawa and for Canada. Centre Block had to be completely levelled. People lost their lives.

SY: And can you tell us a bit about the exhibition you’ve put together to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the fire?

GV: The exhibition focuses mostly on the fire, but will also speak to the history of the area that we now know as Parliament Hill. It covers some pre-European contact, traditional hunting grounds of the various Aboriginal groups of the area, as well as its use as the military barrack by the Sappers and Miners during the construction of the [Rideau] Canal; right up until the inauguration of the Peace Tower in 1927. There is mention of modern uses as well.

It features some unique photos and artifacts, including images of the original construction in the 1860s. Quite a few photos will be included of the reconstruction after the fire. We even have a few loans including tools from current dominion sculptor Phil White. He oversees the stonework being done at Parliament. So it’s going to be a very interesting exhibition to commemorate the 100th anniversary. Given our location, we can see Parliament from our doorstep, so it’s a good tie-in to that as well.

SY: Indeed, it’s the perfect place to talk about the history. What approach did you decide to take in telling the story of the fire?

GV: The main focus is on the fire, but I did approach the exhibition as a history of the Hill itself, given it’s such an iconic space, and I think people just assume the Parliament buildings were almost always there. People who live in Ottawa walk by it every day … and every tourist in Ottawa visits the Parliament Buildings. I want to tell the history of the site within the context of the fire, but we do need to tell the story of before [the fire], and what’s coming after as well.

On February 3rd, 1916, the original Parliament Buildings were ravaged by fire. The Victoria Tower, pictured above, was replaced by the Peace Tower and the current Parliament Buildings on Centre Block. Fire of Parliament, Ottawa, 1916, negative: glass plate, Bytown Museum, 2014.004.01.53.02.
On February 3rd, 1916, the original Parliament Buildings were ravaged by fire. The Victoria Tower, pictured above, was replaced by the Peace Tower and the current Parliament Buildings on Centre Block. Fire of Parliament, Ottawa, 1916, negative: glass plate, Bytown Museum, 2014.004.01.53.02.


SY: One of the first things people often want to know is how the fire started. So, what information did you uncover regarding the source of the blaze?

GV: There were a lot of rumours floating around at the time, especially given that the country was at war. Rumours of sabotage, German spies; I think the Fire Chief at the time was quoted saying he heard a few loud explosions that sounded like shells going off … people were quick to jump to conclusions. There were newspaper headlines that were pushing the whole German sabotage aspect and there was a Royal Commission to find the source of the blaze. It would appear that the fire was started by someone accidentally throwing an unextinguished cigar in a wastepaper basket. Sometimes people want a more exciting “spark” (no pun intended!), when essentially [someone] just didn’t use an ashtray.

SY: And what was the process like in selecting the objects for this exhibition?

GV: When we do a temporary exhibition, I try and use as many pieces from our own collection as possible. We do get a few loans from time to time … but we have such a large and eclectic collection and only 5% is on display at the museum at any one time, so the idea is to rotate out as many pieces as possible from our collection.

Once we do the research we pull everything that’s possibly related to Parliament into one spot, start to look at how the research and themes develop and start eliminating artifacts that may not fit. It would be great to have everything on display, but it just doesn’t work.

SY: So how has the topic evolved since you first started creating the exhibition? Did you have to make any compromises?

GV: There’s always compromises. When the development of an exhibition begins, you start with this huge research paper, it could be 50 pages, and then you have to whittle that down to, let’s say, 10 thematic panels of 200 words each. The space is limited, and people’s attention spans are at a premium. You can’t just have essays on the wall and hope people are going to read everything.

My approach is always “less is more”; but each panel needs to discuss a “must, should and could”. So if people read the title of a panel they must know what the main theme is. If they read the first paragraph they should know a little more, and if they want to read the entire thing, they [could] get all three of those levels.

SY: That sounds like a really good system to gauge the levels of engagement.

GV: Exactly, you want people to at least get, “this is about the Fire of Parliament.” And it seems cliché but a picture is worth a thousand words. So if people are just going to read the titles and then look at the photos, they’re still going to get what you’re trying to put out there.

SY: Do you have a favourite object in the exhibition?

GV: We have a tiny 2 inch by 2 inch little albumen print [pictured below] that shows Parliament Hill when it was still Barrack Hill; you can see the military barrack in the photo. To see a photo of the Hill that’s so iconic, without the Parliament buildings is really cool. I think people are going to think it’s really interesting to see that site as it was used previous to that.

Its initial intended purpose was this defensive fortress and then it transformed into this simpler barrack, then Parliament Hill eventually. I do talk about it briefly in the exhibition but the Canal was built because of the American threat in 1812 … they originally planned to build this huge fortress up on Parliament Hill. They envisioned fighting off invasion, but after the threat diminished it evolved into just a few stone buildings. The exhibit will show the original plans with the barrack buildings, which I think people haven’t probably seen too much of before.

The hill before the original Parliament buildings were built, c.1857. Barrack Hill, Ottawa, C.W., 1857, print: albumen, Bytown Museum, P1775c.
The hill before the original Parliament buildings were built, c.1857. Barrack Hill, Ottawa, C.W., 1857, print: albumen, Bytown Museum, P1775c.


SY: It does seem like something that people wouldn’t have really thought about, or questioned. Like you said, Parliament is an icon, but there’s a lot of history.

GV: Exactly, and you could do a whole exhibition on the archaeology of the hill previous to Parliament Hill. But given that it’s mostly about the fire, again, compromises. A few years ago we did a project with Carleton University … one of the things they did was a kind of 3D reconstruction of Barrack Hill so I’ve worked with them to get permission to use some of the videos. I’ve made a compilation video where people can see what the Hill would have looked like previous to Parliament.

SY: I think that’s really important! I often try to picture what things would look like before. What would you say has been the most challenging aspect of working on the exhibition?

GV: I mean, in a small museum it’s time and resources. I have a number of other projects on the go, as does everyone who works here, so it’s always about balance. We set a launch date; given that we want it to open before the anniversary of the fire, you can’t be late, there’s all this publicity and promotion that goes along with it. Everything from the design work to getting things back from the frame shop and the printers on time, having the painters scheduled to come in, and having the space ready for them.

But at the same time, I like to do a lot of it on my own. I take help when I need it, but I really prefer to have that final say. So the exhibit develops and it’s everyone involved, from Algonquin [College students] to all the staff who proofread my text … I share my design work and get people’s opinions, but when it comes to the final install, I like to just do it myself.

DSC_0521
Entrance to Forged in Fire: The Building and Burning of Parliament. The exhibition is open until October 31, 2016.

SY: Is there anything else you’d like to add?

GV: Yeah, just an interesting side note that most people don’t know – and it’s touched on really briefly in the exhibition – but there was a fire in 1897 when West Block was gutted. They didn’t have to tear it down … but it was before there was a National Archives, so a lot of nationally and federally important documents were stored in Parliament. I think it was what would later become the Federal Transport Agency, so it dealt with things like the canals … all those records were destroyed in the fire. So that actually led to the establishment of the Library and Archives Canada. There’s a little sub-theme panel on that fire, with two images of the fire itself. A lot of people wouldn’t know that there was an earlier fire of Parliament.

SY: Did that impact how they dealt with the 1916 fire? Were they more prepared?

GV: I don’t know if I’ve come across too much. It is pretty impressive when you look at the fact that here we are at war, and yet they rebuilt Centre Block quicker than it was built the first time. With half the male population basically overseas … to see the country pulling together during war, they didn’t skip a beat in terms of the government. They had an emergency Parliament at Chateau Laurier the night of the fire; and then they moved it over to what’s now the Canadian Museum of Nature [Victoria Memorial Building] until Centre Block was ready to be occupied again. So to see how quickly they were able to recover was pretty impressive.

SY: I think it speaks to how important Parliament is as an institution. Even at that time it was a big deal that happened but it’s interesting how [Parliamentarians] worked with what they had before they could repair the Parliament buildings.

GV: Exactly. And another interesting point is that people always look at the Peace Tower as this icon that’s been there forever but they don’t realize that there was the Victoria Tower previously. The Peace Tower was a new addition that was bigger, and it stands for something different. So to show people pictures of the early Parliament without the Peace Tower is going to be eye-opening.

SY: Well, it sounds like a really interesting exhibition, and I’m looking forward to seeing it.

GV: Thank you! I’m excited.

SY: Thanks very much.

 

Serena is a student at the University of Ottawa in History and English Literature. An advocate for the preservation of local history, Serena volunteered at Fort York National Historic Site in Toronto, for the bicentennial of the War of 1812. After moving to Ottawa, she joined the Bytown Youth Council to help promote Ottawa’s history. She enjoys reading, writing and exploring the city, where there’s always something new to discover!


 

Des questions brûlantes : L’incendie du Parlement de 1916

par Serena Y.

Nous soulignons aujourd’hui le 100e anniversaire de l’incendie du Parlement, survenu le 3 février 1916. Serena, membre du Conseil des jeunes, a interviewé Grant Vogl, gestionnaire des collections et des expositions. Tous deux ont discuté de l’histoire de la colline, des causes de l’incendie et de la reconstruction du Parlement, sujets dont traite la nouvelle exposition du MUSÉE BYTOWN MUSEUM intitulée Façonnés par le feu : Les édifices du Parlement.

Serena Y : Tout d’abord, parlez‑nous de l’incendie du Parlement de 1916.

Grant Vogl : L’incendie a été tout simplement dévastateur. Le principal édifice administratif du gouvernement fédéral du Canada a été entièrement anéanti. Il s’agit d’un événement majeur tant pour Ottawa que pour le Canada tout entier. L’édifice du Centre a été complètement détruit. Des gens y ont perdu la vie.


SY : En quoi consiste l’exposition que vous avez réalisée pour commémorer le 100e anniversaire de l’incendie?

GV : L’exposition s’attache surtout à l’incendie, mais elle témoigne aussi de l’histoire de la colline du Parlement. Elle se penche sur certains échanges pré‑européens et traite des territoires de chasse traditionnels des divers groupes autochtones de la région. Elle examine également comment les sapeurs et les mineurs ont utilisé la colline comme campement militaire pendant la construction du canal [Rideau]. L’exposition se rend jusqu’à l’inauguration de la tour de la Paix en 1927, et elle mentionne les usages modernes.

On y présente des photographies et des artefacts exceptionnels, dont des images de la construction originale datant des années 1860. Plusieurs photos de la reconstruction qui a suivi l’incendie seront aussi incluses. Nous avons même bénéficié de certains prêts, tels que des outils de l’actuel sculpteur du Dominion, Phil White. Celui‑ci supervise les travaux sur pierre réalisés au Parlement. Ce sera donc une exposition très intéressante qui soulignera le 100e anniversaire de l’incendie. Compte tenu de l’emplacement du Musée, on peut voir le Parlement de notre porte, ce qui crée aussi un lien intéressant.


SY : Bien sûr, c’est l’endroit idéal pour parler d’histoire. Quelle approche avez‑vous choisie pour raconter ce récit?

GV : Je me suis surtout attaché à l’incendie, mais l’exposition est avant tout l’histoire de la colline, puisqu’il s’agit d’un lieu emblématique. Je crois que les gens pensent que les édifices du Parlement ont été là de tout temps. Les résidents d’Ottawa passent devant eux chaque jour… et chaque touriste d’Ottawa les visite. Je veux raconter l’histoire du lieu dans le contexte de l’incendie, mais il faut raconter ce qui a précédé et ce qui y a succédé.

2014.004.01.53.02_001_Bytown_crop
Le 3 février 1916, un incendie ravage les édifices originaux du Parlement. La tour de la Paix et les bâtiments actuels de l’édifice du Centre remplacent la tour Victoria (photo ci dessus). Incendie au Parlement, Ottawa, 1916, négatif sur plaque de verre, Musée Bytown, 2014.004.01.53.02.

SY : Les gens veulent souvent savoir comment a commencé l’incendie. Quelles informations avez vous découvertes à ce sujet?

GV : Il courait de nombreuses rumeurs à l’époque, surtout que le pays était en guerre : rumeurs de sabotage, d’espions allemands. Le chef des pompiers de l’époque a été cité disant qu’il avait entendu plusieurs fortes explosions semblables à des tirs d’obus. Les gens ont vite fait de sauter aux conclusions. Les gros titres des journaux appuyaient la thèse d’un sabotage allemand, et la Commission royale d’enquête créée pour la circonstance n’a pas pu trouver la cause de l’incendie. Il semblerait que quelqu’un ait mis le feu en jetant par mégarde un cigare allumé dans une corbeille à papier. Parfois, les gens veulent une étincelle plus exaltante (le jeu de mot n’est pas voulu), alors que simplement, [quelqu’un] n’a pas utilisé de cendrier.
SY : Quel a été le processus de sélection des objets de l’exposition?

GV : En préparant une exposition temporaire, j’essaie d’utiliser autant de pièces que possible de notre propre collection. Nous bénéficions de prêts de temps à autre… mais nous possédons une collection si grande et si variée que seulement 5 p. cent des pièces sont exposées au Musée à n’importe quel moment donné. Il s’agit donc de présenter à tour de rôle autant de pièces que possible de notre collection.

Une fois la recherche effectuée, nous avons mis de côté tout ce qui pouvait avoir trait au Parlement, puis nous avons commencé à dégager les thèmes et la recherche à faire et nous avons éliminé les artefacts non pertinents. Ce serait bien de pouvoir tout exposer, mais ça ne fonctionne pas.
SY : Comment le sujet a¬ t il évolué depuis que vous avez commencé à mettre sur pied l’exposition? Avez vous dû faire des compromis?

GV : On doit toujours faire des compromis. Quand on commence à élaborer une exposition, on débute avec un document de recherche volumineux, qui peut contenir 50 pages, et qu’il faut réduire à environ 10 panneaux thématiques de 200 mots chacun. L’espace est limité, et l’attention des gens aussi. On ne peut pas afficher sur les murs de longs essais en espérant que les visiteurs les liront entièrement.

Mon approche se fonde sur le principe que « plus, c’est moins ». Mais on doit discuter de chaque panneau et classer l’information selon trois niveaux : « doit, devrait, pourrait ». Donc, lorsqu’un visiteur lit le titre d’un panneau, il doit savoir en quoi consiste le thème principal. S’il lit le premier paragraphe, il devrait en savoir un peu plus, et s’il lisait tout le panneau, il pourrait accéder à ces trois niveaux d’information.
SY : Cela semble être un excellent moyen de mesurer le degré d’engagement.

GV : Tout à fait. On veut que les visiteurs sachent que l’exposition porte sur « l’incendie au Parlement ». On dit que c’est un cliché, mais une image vaut mille mots. Ainsi, si les gens se contentent de lire les titres et de regarder les photos, ils saisiront quand même ce qu’on essaie de leur transmettre.
SY : Y a-t il un objet que vous préférez dans l’exposition?

GV : L’exposition inclut une minuscule épreuve à l’albumine de 2 pouces sur 2 pouces (photo ci dessous) qui montre la colline du Parlement à l’époque où elle était encore Barrack Hill, et sur laquelle on aperçoit le campement militaire. C’est extraordinaire de voir la colline, cet emblème si connu, sans les édifices du Parlement. Je pense que les visiteurs vont trouver très intéressant d’avoir une image du lieu qui montre son utilisation précédente.

À l’origine, l’endroit devait accueillir une forteresse, mais il n’a été qu’un simple campement avant de devenir la colline du Parlement. J’en parle brièvement dans l’exposition : le canal a été construit à cause de la menace américaine, en 1812. On avait prévu à l’origine bâtir une immense forteresse sur la colline du Parlement, pour combattre l’invasion, mais lorsque la menace a diminué, la forteresse n’a plus été qu’un petit édifice de pierre. L’exposition présente les plans originaux avec les édifices du campement. Je crois que les visiteurs n’ont pas dû les voir souvent.

P1775c_003_Bytown_crop
La colline avant la construction des édifices originaux du Parlement, vers 1857, Barrack Hill, Ottawa, C.W., 1857. épreuve à l’albumine, Musée Bytown, P1775c.

SY : Les gens ne semblent pas en effet y avoir pensé ni s’être interrogés à ce sujet. Comme vous le dites, le Parlement est un emblème, mais il est riche d’histoire.

GV : Exactement. On pourrait monter toute une exposition sur l’archéologie de la colline telle qu’elle était avant la construction du Parlement. Mais comme nous avons pour sujet l’incendie, nous avons fait des compromis. Voilà quelques années, le Musée a monté un projet avec la Carleton University… qui a entre autres réalisé une sorte de reproduction en 3D de Barrack Hill. L’Université nous a autorisés à utiliser certaines vidéos. J’ai fait une compilation de celles où l’on peut voir à quoi ressemblait la colline avant la construction du Parlement.
SY : Cela me semble important! J’essaie souvent d’imaginer à quoi ressemblaient les choses auparavant. Quel a été selon vous le plus grand défi posé par la production de cette exposition?

GV : Dans un petit musée, le temps et les ressources manquent toujours. Je travaille en même temps à plusieurs projets, et tous mes collègues aussi. Il faut donc trouver sans cesse l’équilibre. Nous décidons d’une date de lancement. Comme nous désirons que l’exposition commence avant la date d’anniversaire de l’incendie, nous ne pouvons nous permettre aucun retard. Il faut aussi penser à la publicité et à la promotion, élaborer le concept graphique, s’assurer que les choses reviennent à temps de chez l’encadreur et de chez l’imprimeur, prévoir une date pour les peintres et préparer l’espace avant leur arrivée.

Mais en même temps, j’aime faire les choses par moi même. Je reçois de l’aide quand j’en ai besoin, mais je préfère avoir le dernier mot. L’exposition évolue donc et tout le monde y participe, [des étudiants] du collège Algonquin à tout le personnel qui relit mon texte… Je montre mon concept graphique et les gens me donnent leur avis, mais pour ce qui est de l’installation finale, je la réalise moi même.

DSC_0521
Entrée de Façonnés par le feu : Les édifices du Parlement. L’exposition gardera l’affiche jusqu’au 31 octobre 2016.

SY : Souhaitez‑vous préciser autre chose?

GV : Oui, juste une petite note intéressante sur quelque chose que la plupart des gens ignorent – et que l’exposition aborde très brièvement. Il y a eu un incendie en 1897, et l’édifice de l’Ouest a été détruit. Il n’a pas été nécessaire de le raser… C’était avant la création des Archives nationales, donc nombre de documents fédéraux et nationaux importants étaient conservés au Parlement. Je pense que c’est ce qui est devenu plus tard l’Agence de transport fédérale, qui s’occupait de questions comme les canaux et autres. L’incendie a détruit tous ces documents, d’où l’instauration de Bibliothèque et Archives Canada. Nous avons consacré un panneau sous-thématique à cet incendie dont nous présentons deux images. Plusieurs personnes ignorent tout de ce premier incendie du Parlement.

SY : Cet incendie a‑t‑il eu une incidence sur celui de 1916? Avait‑on pris des précautions particulières? 

GV : Je ne sais pas si j’ai consulté trop de documentation. Il est impressionnant de considérer que, lorsque l’incendie s’est déclaré, le pays était en pleine guerre; et pourtant l’édifice de l’Ouest a été reconstruit plus vite que la première fois, même si plus de la moitié des hommes combattaient alors outremer. Le pays a réussi à concerter ses efforts pendant la guerre, et le gouvernement n’a pas manqué une seule séance. Le Parlement a siégé d’urgence au Château Laurier durant la nuit de l’incendie. Puis il a tenu ses séances à l’édifice commémoratif Victoria (l’actuel Musée de la nature) jusqu’à ce que l’édifice du Centre soit de nouveau prêt. Il est donc impressionnant de constater avec quelle rapidité le gouvernement a réussi à poursuivre ses activités.

SY : Cela témoigne de l’importance du Parlement en tant qu’institution. Même à l’époque, cet événement avait une grande portée. Il est intéressant de voir comment [les parlementaires] ont composé avec les moyens du bord avant que les édifices du Parlement soient reconstruits.

GV : Oui, tout à fait. Autre point intéressant, c’est que les gens considèrent la tour de la Paix comme un emblème présent de tout temps, sans prendre conscience qu’autrefois, c’est la tour Victoria qui était là. La tour de la Paix a été construite après l’incendie, plus grande, et son symbolisme est différent. Ainsi, montrer au public des images de l’ancien Parlement sans la tour de la Paix va lui faire prendre conscience qu’elle n’a pas toujours existé.

SY : L’exposition promet d’être vraiment intéressante; j’ai bien hâte de la visiter.

GV : Merci! Je suis très emballé.

SY : Merci beaucoup.


Serena étudie l’histoire et la littérature anglaise à l’Université d’Ottawa. Engagée dans la préservation de l’histoire locale, elle a fait du bénévolat à Fort-York, un lieu historique national situé à Toronto, à l’occasion du 200e anniversaire de la guerre de 1812. Une fois installée à Ottawa, elle s’est jointe au Conseil des jeunes du Musée Bytown pour aider à promouvoir l’histoire d’Ottawa. Elle aime lire, écrire et explorer la ville où elle découvre toujours quelque chose de nouveau!

 

 

 

Breaking the Ice: The brave beginnings of women’s hockey | Briser la glace : Les courageux débuts du hockey féminin

Written by Lilia L.

“He shoots, he scores!” It’s a national heartbeat that echoes around arenas, pulses through bars, and livens up family rooms. But if you add just one letter, those four words tell a whole other story. “She shoots, she scores!” It is the story of women’s hockey.

The Puck Drops Here

This story begins in Ottawa on March 8, 1889, with the local evening paper reporting: At Rideau Skating rink this morning two hockey matches were played.  The first a ladies match between Government House and the Rideau Skating club resulting in a win for the Government House.” These brief sentences signified a landmark moment: the earliest historical record of any women’s-only hockey game. Ottawa was also the setting for the first photograph, dating to 1890, of a women’s hockey game. The common thread between these events was a young woman called Isobel Stanley who played in both games. She was the daughter of Lord Stanley, Governor General from 1888-1893, the man who would later create the sport’s most coveted trophy, the Stanley Cup. He wholeheartedly adopted the Canadian lifestyle and played hockey with his family at the Rideau Hall rink. It was here that Isobel was photographed in action with other Ottawa ladies.

This is the first photograph of women playing hockey, circa 1890. Isobel Stanley is seen in white on the left of the photo. Credit: McFarlane, Brian. Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey. Toronto: Stoddart Pub, 1995.
This is the first photograph of women playing hockey, circa 1890. Isobel Stanley is seen in white on the left of the photo. Credit: McFarlane, Brian. Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey. Toronto: Stoddart Pub, 1995.

Furthermore, Ottawa is recognized as the location of the first organized women’s hockey match as documented in the February 11, 1891 edition of the Ottawa Citizen: “A ladies hockey match was played at the Rideau rink yesterday between teams as follows: No. 1: Miss MacIntosh, Captain; Miss Wise, Munro, Ritchie, Camby, Jones, White. No. 2: Miss H Wise, Captain; Miss MacIntosh, Ritchie, McClymont, Burrows and Mrs. Gordon. Number two team won by two goals to none.”

Rookie Season

By the early 1900s, impromptu games with friends had become matches between organized women’s hockey teams. Outdoor games took place across Canada (even in the Yukon during the gold rush) in towns of all sizes. As the sport’s popularity among women grew in Ottawa, so too did it gather momentum elsewhere. Ladies-only regional and university teams were established, although with varying degrees of social acceptance: in Trois-Rivières, women’s games had “No Spectators” signs, while the Queen’s University team in Kingston was popular enough to charge admission.

The Queen’s University hockey team in 1917. In the centre of the middle row sits Charlotte Whitton, who was Ottawa’s first female mayor from 1951-1956 and 1960-1964. Credit: Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274
The Queen’s University hockey team in 1917. In the centre of the middle row sits Charlotte Whitton, who was Ottawa’s first female mayor from 1951-1956 and 1960-1964. Credit: Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274.

Team Colours

In the early 20th century, men’s and women’s fashions were two defined and separate worlds, which was reflected on the ice. Women played wearing a long skirt, a heavy sweater, and a tasselled cap or toque worn over hair that was pinned up with combs. These skirts hindered skating, and became even more cumbersome when they were wet with ice and snow. However, goalies used them to their advantage by sewing weights, such as buckshot pellet, into the hems; this kept the skirt on the ice to cover more of the net. Female goalies also wore chest protectors, unlike men, and the first goalie to wear a facemask was Elizabeth Graham at Queen’s University in 1927. Women used hockey skates or removed picks from the figure skates they were more likely to have.

Examples of women’s hockey uniforms during first decades of the 20th century. Credit, left to right: University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56
Examples of women’s hockey uniforms during first decades of the 20th century. Credit, left to right: University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56.

Ottawa’s Alpha Ladies Club played during the late 1890s, and they wore white jerseys emblazoned with a red “A” on the front along with red skirts and white tam-o-shanters. By the end of the First World War, women were wearing knee-length bloomers, and by the late 1920s, they had adopted hockey pants. Under these, some players protected their legs with shinpads or improvised with magazines.

Rough Ice

The path to success never did run smooth, and women hockey players faced opposition from both society at large and sport institutions. Social concern focused on their health and femininity, and this seemingly Victorian attitude persisted as late as the 1930s, when one reporter wrote, Ice hockey is a game…for which the soft, yielding flesh with which Nature equips the sex, makes them wholly unsuited, to say nothing of the general unwisdom of arming members of the more impassioned gender with clubs to bend over beautiful heads that were surely created for more entrancing purposes.” Medical doctors gave their professional opinion that such vigorous physical activity was dangerous for women’s organs, especially the reproductive system. In addition to being physically harmful, the bodychecking and competitiveness supposedly cultivated undesirable masculine character traits.

The Ottawa Ladies’ College Hockey Group playing at Liverpool Court in March 1906. Credit: Bytown Museum / P2102.
The Ottawa Ladies’ College Hockey Group playing at Liverpool Court in March 1906. Credit: Bytown Museum / P2102.

As a result of these social attitudes, women encountered further obstacles at the institutional level. Sporting associations like the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada did not accept women’s participation in their organized events until the 1910s. Women’s hockey was looked down upon as inferior in everyday play as well. Toronto Star reporter Alexandrine Gibb wrote in 1938 that, “Girls have to take the left overs. From bantams to seniors, the boys get the preference in rinks throughout the province.”

Hockey Town

From those first documented games, women in Ottawa embraced hockey. The enthusiasm for the sport displayed by various Governor Generals’ families set the fashion. After Lord Stanley left the post, the Aberdeens arrived in 1893. While the costume skating balls they hosted were highly popular, their female guests were equally happy to play a hockey game. In 1896, the Aberdeens invited the very successful local Alpha Ladies Club to play against Rideau Ladies Hockey at Government House in a match a reporter described: “Both teams played grandly and surprised hundreds of the sterner sex who went to the match expecting to see many ludicrous scenes and have many good laughs. Indeed, before they were very long, their sympathies and admiration had gone out to the teams. The men became wildly enthusiastic.”

Lord Minto (governor general 1898-1904) skating with his wife. Lady Minto’s participation in a hockey game made it into the newspapers: “Lady Minto played at cover point and the manner in which she went up the ice was a revelation to the other players.” Those words paint a different picture than this photo of a serene figure skater! Credit: Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803
Lord Minto (governor general 1898-1904) skating with his wife. Lady Minto’s participation in a hockey game made it into the newspapers: “Lady Minto played at cover point and the manner in which she went up the ice was a revelation to the other players.” Those words paint a different picture than this photo of a serene figure skater! Credit: Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803.

The next Ottawa team to win hearts and championships was the Ottawa Alerts. In 1922, they were the Ladies Ontario Hockey Association champions, and the following year they defeated the North Toronto women’s team to retain their title. A big factor in their victories was Eva Ault, who was described by newspapers as scoring “at least one goal in practically every game she has played.” In 1924, she served as a vice president of the Ladies’ Ontario Hockey Association. The Ontario championship title returned to Ottawa in 1927, when the Ottawa Rowing Club beat the Toronto Pats.

Eva Ault, the Alerts’ star player, is pictured here in 1917. That year the team, dressed in black and gold and with silk caps, played at a Laurier Avenue rink cheered on by 2000 spectators. Credit: William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029
Eva Ault, the Alerts’ star player, is pictured here in 1917. That year the team, dressed in black and gold and with silk caps, played at a Laurier Avenue rink cheered on by 2000 spectators. Credit: William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029.

By the end of the decade, there were many leagues for women to play in but, as reporter Alexandrine Gibb predicted in 1934, “Women’s hockey is just blossoming out as a Canadian-wide contest…Conditions unexpected and unethical will also face the hockey pioneers.” Although female former athletes were hired by newspapers to write sports columns, most of the coverage was still dedicated to men’s sports. It was men’s hockey teams that continued to get the biggest crowds, the most funding, and the best ice-time. But women’s hockey persevered: in 1998, more than a century after that first game in Ottawa, women’s hockey was recognized as an Olympic sport. The legacy of those women who first passed the puck lives on in today’s female hockey players, who continue to push for the recognition their skills and talents deserve.

The Ottawa Alerts, champions of Ontario and pioneers of women’s hockey. Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130
The Ottawa Alerts, champions of Ontario and pioneers of women’s hockey. Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130.

Lilia Lockwood is a member of the Bytown Museum Youth Council and studies history and political science at the University of Ottawa.


Briser la glace : Les courageux débuts du hockey féminin

Par Lilia L.

« Il lance, et compte! » C’est le crédo d’une nation qui résonne autour des arénas, palpite dans les bars et anime les salles familiales. Mais si vous changez quelques lettres, ces quatre petits mots racontent une tout autre histoire, celle du hockey féminin. « Elle lance, et compte! »

C’est ici que tombe la rondelle

L’histoire commence à Ottawa le 8 mars 1889, dans un journal du soir local qui mentionne : « Sur la patinoire de Rideau ce matin, deux matchs ont été disputés. Le premier, réservé aux dames, opposait la résidence du gouverneur général au club de patinage Rideau. La victoire est allée à la résidence du gouverneur. » Ces courtes phrases marquent un jalon : c’est le premier témoignage historique d’un match de hockey entièrement féminin. Ottawa offre aussi le cadre de la première photographie, prise en en 1890, d’un match de hockey féminin. Le fil qui relie ces événements est une jeune femme, Isobel Stanley : elle a disputé les deux matchs. Elle est la fille de lord Stanley, gouverneur général de 1888 à 1893 qui créera plus tard le trophée le plus convoité du monde des sports, la coupe Stanley. Lord Stanley, adoptant pleinement le mode de vie canadien, joue au hockey avec sa famille sur la patinoire de Rideau Hall. C’est là qu’Isobel a été prise en photo dans le feu de l’action, jouant avec d’autres femmes d’Ottawa.

Voici la première photographie de femmes jouant au hockey, vers 1890. Isobel Stanley, habillée de blanc, se trouve à gauche. Photographie : McFarlane, Brian. Tirée de Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey, Toronto, Stoddart Pub, 1995.
Voici la première photographie de femmes jouant au hockey, vers 1890. Isobel Stanley, habillée de blanc, se trouve à gauche. Photographie : McFarlane, Brian. Tirée de Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey, Toronto, Stoddart Pub, 1995.

De plus, c’est à Ottawa que s’est déroulé le premier match de hockey féminin organisé, comme en témoigne l’Ottawa Citizen du 11 février 1891 : « Hier, deux équipes de femmes se sont disputé un match sur la patinoire Rideau. En voici les membres : 1re équipe – Mlle MacIntosh, capitaine; Mlles Wise, Munro, Ritchie, Camby, Jones et White. 2e équipe – Mlle H. Wise, capitaine; Mlles MacIntosh, Ritchie, McClymont, Burrows et Mme Gordon. La seconde équipe a remporté le match en marquant deux buts à zéro. »

Une première saison

Au début des années 1900, on est passé des jeux improvisés avec des amis aux matchs organisés entre équipes de hockey féminin. Des jeux se disputent sur des patinoires extérieures un peu partout au Canada, y compris au Yukon à l’époque de la ruée vers l’or, dans des villes de toutes tailles. En même temps que ce jeu devient de plus en plus populaire auprès des femmes d’Ottawa, il mobilise aussi les femmes partout ailleurs. Des équipes universitaires ou régionales, uniquement féminines, sont formées, mais la société les acceptent à des degrés divers : à Trois-Rivières, les matchs féminins affichent « pas de spectateurs », tandis que l’équipe de l’Université Queens’s à Kingston est si populaire qu’elle facture un prix d’entrée.

Équipe de hockey de l’Université Queen’s en 1917. Au centre dans la rangée du milieu est assise Charlotte Whitton, qui deviendra la première femme maire d’Ottawa de 1951 à1956 et de 1960 à 1964. Source : Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274
Équipe de hockey de l’Université Queen’s en 1917. Au centre dans la rangée du milieu est assise Charlotte Whitton, qui deviendra la première femme maire d’Ottawa de 1951 à1956 et de 1960 à 1964. Source : Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274.

Les couleurs des équipes

Au début du XXe siècle, la mode pour hommes et celle pour femmes forment deux mondes très distincts, et cette réalité se prolonge sur la glace. Les femmes portent de longues jupes et des chandails épais, et elles arborent une tuque ou un bonnet à pompon attaché à leurs cheveux par un peigne. Les jupes entravent leurs mouvements sur la glace, et elles deviennent encore plus encombrantes lorsqu’elles s’imprègnent de glace et de neige. Cependant, les gardiennes de but en tirent parti en cousant dans les ourlets des poids tels que des balles de plomb. Ainsi alourdie, la jupe reste sur la glace et couvre une plus grande surface de filet. Les gardiennes de but portent aussi des protections à la poitrine, au contraire des hommes, et la première gardienne de but qui portera un masque en 1927 est Elizabeth Graham, membre de l’équipe de l’Université Queen’s. Les femmes utilisent des patins pour le hockey, ou elles retirent les pics des patins pour patinage artistique qu’elles sont plus susceptibles de posséder.

Exemples d’uniformes féminins de hockey pendant les premières décennies du XXe siècle. Sources (de gauche à droite) : University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56
Exemples d’uniformes féminins de hockey pendant les premières décennies du XXe siècle. Sources (de gauche à droite) : University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56.

L’Alpha Ladies Club d’Ottawa a été actif à la fin des années 1890. Les membres portaient des chandails blancs avec un blason en forme de « A » rouge sur la poitrine, une jupe rouge et un béret blanc. À la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale, les femmes portent des culottes bouffantes arrivant aux genoux, et à la fin des années 1920, elles adoptent le pantalon de hockey. Sous ce vêtement, certaines joueuses protègent leurs jambes à l’aide de protège-tibias ou elles rembourrent leur pantalon de magazines.

La glace rugueuse

Le chemin du succès n’est jamais lisse, et les joueuses de hockey doivent affronter le refus de l’ensemble de la société comme celui des établissements sportifs. On se préoccupe de leur santé et de leur féminité, et cette attitude apparemment victorienne persiste jusque dans les années 1930, lorsqu’un journaliste écrit : « Le hockey sur glace est un jeu […] qui ne convient aucunement aux femmes, étant donné la chair tendre et molle dont la Nature les a équipées, pour ne rien dire de l’imprudence générale qui arme les membres du genre le plus ardent de bâtons à incliner au dessus de leurs belles têtes sûrement créées à des fins plus ravissantes. » Les médecins donnent aussi leur avis professionnel, déclarant qu’une activité physique aussi vigoureuse est dangereuse pour les organes féminins, en particulier pour l’appareil génital. En plus des torts physiques que causerait le sport, on croit que la mise en échec et la compétitivité cultiveraient des traits de caractère masculins indésirables.

L’équipe de hockey de l’Ottawa Ladies’ College jouant à Liverpool Court en mars 1906. Source : Musée Bytown / P2102.
L’équipe de hockey de l’Ottawa Ladies’ College jouant à Liverpool Court en mars 1906. Source : Musée Bytown / P2102.

Conséquence de ces attitudes sociales, les femmes se heurtent à d’autres obstacles auprès des établissements. Les associations sportives telles que l’Amateur Athletic Union of Canada refuse que les femmes participent à ses activités jusque dans les années 1910. Même dans les jeux de tous les jours, le hockey féminin passe pour inférieur à celui des hommes. En 1938, la journaliste Alexandrine Gibb écrit dans le Toronto Star que « les filles doivent se contenter des restes. Des joueurs novices aux chevronnés, les garçons ont priorité dans toutes les patinoires de la province. »

La ville du hockey

Depuis ces premiers jeux documentés, les femmes d’Ottawa ont adopté le hockey. L’enthousiasme voué à ce sport par les familles de plusieurs gouverneurs généraux le rend à la mode. Après que lord Stanley quitte son poste, les Aberdeen arrivent en 1893. Leurs bals costumés sur glace sont très populaires, mais leurs invitées sont également ravies de participer à un match de hockey. En 1896, les Aberdeen invitent le très populaire Alpha Ladies Club local à jouer contre les membres du Rideau Ladies Hockey à la résidence du gouverneur général. Voici comment un journaliste décrit ce match : « Les deux équipes ont très bien joué et ont surpris des centaines de membres du sexe grave venus au match en pensant y voir plusieurs scènes grotesques et rire de bon cœur. En vérité, avant longtemps, les équipes ont suscité leur sympathie et leur admiration. Les hommes sont devenus très enthousiastes. »

Lord Minto, gouverneur général de 1898 à 1904, patine avec son épouse. Les journaux relatent ainsi la participation de lady Minto à un match de hockey : « Lady Minto a joué en première défense, et la manière dont elle s’est déplacée sur la glace a été une révélation pour les autres joueurs. » Ces mots décrivent une scène différente de celle que montre cette photo, où l’on voit une patineuse tranquille! Source : Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803
Lord Minto, gouverneur général de 1898 à 1904, patine avec son épouse. Les journaux relatent ainsi la participation de lady Minto à un match de hockey : « Lady Minto a joué en première défense, et la manière dont elle s’est déplacée sur la glace a été une révélation pour les autres joueurs. » Ces mots décrivent une scène différente de celle que montre cette photo, où l’on voit une patineuse tranquille! Source : Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803.

C’est ensuite l’équipe des Alerts d’Ottawa qui gagne le cœur des gens et les championnats. En 1922, ses membres sont les championnes de la Ladies Ontario Hockey Association, et l’année suivante, elles battent l’équipe féminine de North Toronto pour garder leur titre. Leurs victoires, elles les doivent beaucoup à Eva Ault, que décrivent ainsi les journaux : « [elle a marqué] au moins un but dans pratiquement chaque match qu’elle a joué ». En 1924, Eva Ault devient vice-présidente de la Ladies Ontario Hockey Association. Le titre des championnats d’Ontario revient à Ottawa en 1927, lorsque l’Ottawa Rowing Club bat les Toronto Pats.

Cette photo montre Eva Ault, joueuse étoile des Alerts, en 1917. Cette année là, l’équipe, vêtue de noir et d’or avec un bonnet de soie blanche, a joué sur une patinoire de l’avenue Laurier devant 2 000 spectateurs. Source : William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029.
Cette photo montre Eva Ault, joueuse étoile des Alerts, en 1917. Cette année là, l’équipe, vêtue de noir et d’or avec un bonnet de soie blanche, a joué sur une patinoire de l’avenue Laurier devant 2 000 spectateurs. Source : William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029.

À la fin de la décennie, plusieurs ligues féminines se sont formées, mais comme l’a prédit la journaliste Alexandrine Gibb en 1934, « le hockey féminin commence tout juste à devenir un sport de compétition à l’échelle du Canada. Les pionnières du hockey vont aussi affronter des situations inattendues et non éthiques. » Bien que les journaux engagent d’anciennes athlètes pour écrire les chroniques sportives, la plupart des articles sont consacrés aux activités des hommes. Les équipes de hockey masculin continuent d’attirer les foules, de recevoir l’essentiel du financement et d’accéder aux meilleurs moments sur la glace. Mais les femmes persévèrent : en 1998, plus d’un siècle après le premier match disputé à Ottawa, le hockey féminin devient une discipline aux Jeux olympiques. L’héritage de ces femmes qui, les premières, ont envoyé la rondelle se perpétue aujourd’hui parmi les joueuses de hockey d’aujourd’hui qui continuent de chercher à faire reconnaître leurs compétences et leur talent.

Les Alerts d’Ottawa, championnes de l’Ontario et pionnières du hockey féminin. Source : Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130.
Les Alerts d’Ottawa, championnes de l’Ontario et pionnières du hockey féminin. Source : Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130.

Lilia L. est un membre du Conseil de la jeunesse Musée Bytown et étudie l’histoire et la science politique à l’Université d’Ottawa.