Breaking the Ice: The brave beginnings of women’s hockey | Briser la glace : Les courageux débuts du hockey féminin

Written by Lilia L.

“He shoots, he scores!” It’s a national heartbeat that echoes around arenas, pulses through bars, and livens up family rooms. But if you add just one letter, those four words tell a whole other story. “She shoots, she scores!” It is the story of women’s hockey.

The Puck Drops Here

This story begins in Ottawa on March 8, 1889, with the local evening paper reporting: At Rideau Skating rink this morning two hockey matches were played.  The first a ladies match between Government House and the Rideau Skating club resulting in a win for the Government House.” These brief sentences signified a landmark moment: the earliest historical record of any women’s-only hockey game. Ottawa was also the setting for the first photograph, dating to 1890, of a women’s hockey game. The common thread between these events was a young woman called Isobel Stanley who played in both games. She was the daughter of Lord Stanley, Governor General from 1888-1893, the man who would later create the sport’s most coveted trophy, the Stanley Cup. He wholeheartedly adopted the Canadian lifestyle and played hockey with his family at the Rideau Hall rink. It was here that Isobel was photographed in action with other Ottawa ladies.

This is the first photograph of women playing hockey, circa 1890. Isobel Stanley is seen in white on the left of the photo. Credit: McFarlane, Brian. Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey. Toronto: Stoddart Pub, 1995.
This is the first photograph of women playing hockey, circa 1890. Isobel Stanley is seen in white on the left of the photo. Credit: McFarlane, Brian. Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey. Toronto: Stoddart Pub, 1995.

Furthermore, Ottawa is recognized as the location of the first organized women’s hockey match as documented in the February 11, 1891 edition of the Ottawa Citizen: “A ladies hockey match was played at the Rideau rink yesterday between teams as follows: No. 1: Miss MacIntosh, Captain; Miss Wise, Munro, Ritchie, Camby, Jones, White. No. 2: Miss H Wise, Captain; Miss MacIntosh, Ritchie, McClymont, Burrows and Mrs. Gordon. Number two team won by two goals to none.”

Rookie Season

By the early 1900s, impromptu games with friends had become matches between organized women’s hockey teams. Outdoor games took place across Canada (even in the Yukon during the gold rush) in towns of all sizes. As the sport’s popularity among women grew in Ottawa, so too did it gather momentum elsewhere. Ladies-only regional and university teams were established, although with varying degrees of social acceptance: in Trois-Rivières, women’s games had “No Spectators” signs, while the Queen’s University team in Kingston was popular enough to charge admission.

The Queen’s University hockey team in 1917. In the centre of the middle row sits Charlotte Whitton, who was Ottawa’s first female mayor from 1951-1956 and 1960-1964. Credit: Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274
The Queen’s University hockey team in 1917. In the centre of the middle row sits Charlotte Whitton, who was Ottawa’s first female mayor from 1951-1956 and 1960-1964. Credit: Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274.

Team Colours

In the early 20th century, men’s and women’s fashions were two defined and separate worlds, which was reflected on the ice. Women played wearing a long skirt, a heavy sweater, and a tasselled cap or toque worn over hair that was pinned up with combs. These skirts hindered skating, and became even more cumbersome when they were wet with ice and snow. However, goalies used them to their advantage by sewing weights, such as buckshot pellet, into the hems; this kept the skirt on the ice to cover more of the net. Female goalies also wore chest protectors, unlike men, and the first goalie to wear a facemask was Elizabeth Graham at Queen’s University in 1927. Women used hockey skates or removed picks from the figure skates they were more likely to have.

Examples of women’s hockey uniforms during first decades of the 20th century. Credit, left to right: University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56
Examples of women’s hockey uniforms during first decades of the 20th century. Credit, left to right: University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56.

Ottawa’s Alpha Ladies Club played during the late 1890s, and they wore white jerseys emblazoned with a red “A” on the front along with red skirts and white tam-o-shanters. By the end of the First World War, women were wearing knee-length bloomers, and by the late 1920s, they had adopted hockey pants. Under these, some players protected their legs with shinpads or improvised with magazines.

Rough Ice

The path to success never did run smooth, and women hockey players faced opposition from both society at large and sport institutions. Social concern focused on their health and femininity, and this seemingly Victorian attitude persisted as late as the 1930s, when one reporter wrote, Ice hockey is a game…for which the soft, yielding flesh with which Nature equips the sex, makes them wholly unsuited, to say nothing of the general unwisdom of arming members of the more impassioned gender with clubs to bend over beautiful heads that were surely created for more entrancing purposes.” Medical doctors gave their professional opinion that such vigorous physical activity was dangerous for women’s organs, especially the reproductive system. In addition to being physically harmful, the bodychecking and competitiveness supposedly cultivated undesirable masculine character traits.

The Ottawa Ladies’ College Hockey Group playing at Liverpool Court in March 1906. Credit: Bytown Museum / P2102.
The Ottawa Ladies’ College Hockey Group playing at Liverpool Court in March 1906. Credit: Bytown Museum / P2102.

As a result of these social attitudes, women encountered further obstacles at the institutional level. Sporting associations like the Amateur Athletic Union of Canada did not accept women’s participation in their organized events until the 1910s. Women’s hockey was looked down upon as inferior in everyday play as well. Toronto Star reporter Alexandrine Gibb wrote in 1938 that, “Girls have to take the left overs. From bantams to seniors, the boys get the preference in rinks throughout the province.”

Hockey Town

From those first documented games, women in Ottawa embraced hockey. The enthusiasm for the sport displayed by various Governor Generals’ families set the fashion. After Lord Stanley left the post, the Aberdeens arrived in 1893. While the costume skating balls they hosted were highly popular, their female guests were equally happy to play a hockey game. In 1896, the Aberdeens invited the very successful local Alpha Ladies Club to play against Rideau Ladies Hockey at Government House in a match a reporter described: “Both teams played grandly and surprised hundreds of the sterner sex who went to the match expecting to see many ludicrous scenes and have many good laughs. Indeed, before they were very long, their sympathies and admiration had gone out to the teams. The men became wildly enthusiastic.”

Lord Minto (governor general 1898-1904) skating with his wife. Lady Minto’s participation in a hockey game made it into the newspapers: “Lady Minto played at cover point and the manner in which she went up the ice was a revelation to the other players.” Those words paint a different picture than this photo of a serene figure skater! Credit: Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803
Lord Minto (governor general 1898-1904) skating with his wife. Lady Minto’s participation in a hockey game made it into the newspapers: “Lady Minto played at cover point and the manner in which she went up the ice was a revelation to the other players.” Those words paint a different picture than this photo of a serene figure skater! Credit: Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803.

The next Ottawa team to win hearts and championships was the Ottawa Alerts. In 1922, they were the Ladies Ontario Hockey Association champions, and the following year they defeated the North Toronto women’s team to retain their title. A big factor in their victories was Eva Ault, who was described by newspapers as scoring “at least one goal in practically every game she has played.” In 1924, she served as a vice president of the Ladies’ Ontario Hockey Association. The Ontario championship title returned to Ottawa in 1927, when the Ottawa Rowing Club beat the Toronto Pats.

Eva Ault, the Alerts’ star player, is pictured here in 1917. That year the team, dressed in black and gold and with silk caps, played at a Laurier Avenue rink cheered on by 2000 spectators. Credit: William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029
Eva Ault, the Alerts’ star player, is pictured here in 1917. That year the team, dressed in black and gold and with silk caps, played at a Laurier Avenue rink cheered on by 2000 spectators. Credit: William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029.

By the end of the decade, there were many leagues for women to play in but, as reporter Alexandrine Gibb predicted in 1934, “Women’s hockey is just blossoming out as a Canadian-wide contest…Conditions unexpected and unethical will also face the hockey pioneers.” Although female former athletes were hired by newspapers to write sports columns, most of the coverage was still dedicated to men’s sports. It was men’s hockey teams that continued to get the biggest crowds, the most funding, and the best ice-time. But women’s hockey persevered: in 1998, more than a century after that first game in Ottawa, women’s hockey was recognized as an Olympic sport. The legacy of those women who first passed the puck lives on in today’s female hockey players, who continue to push for the recognition their skills and talents deserve.

The Ottawa Alerts, champions of Ontario and pioneers of women’s hockey. Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130
The Ottawa Alerts, champions of Ontario and pioneers of women’s hockey. Credit: Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130.

Lilia Lockwood is a member of the Bytown Museum Youth Council and studies history and political science at the University of Ottawa.


Briser la glace : Les courageux débuts du hockey féminin

Par Lilia L.

« Il lance, et compte! » C’est le crédo d’une nation qui résonne autour des arénas, palpite dans les bars et anime les salles familiales. Mais si vous changez quelques lettres, ces quatre petits mots racontent une tout autre histoire, celle du hockey féminin. « Elle lance, et compte! »

C’est ici que tombe la rondelle

L’histoire commence à Ottawa le 8 mars 1889, dans un journal du soir local qui mentionne : « Sur la patinoire de Rideau ce matin, deux matchs ont été disputés. Le premier, réservé aux dames, opposait la résidence du gouverneur général au club de patinage Rideau. La victoire est allée à la résidence du gouverneur. » Ces courtes phrases marquent un jalon : c’est le premier témoignage historique d’un match de hockey entièrement féminin. Ottawa offre aussi le cadre de la première photographie, prise en en 1890, d’un match de hockey féminin. Le fil qui relie ces événements est une jeune femme, Isobel Stanley : elle a disputé les deux matchs. Elle est la fille de lord Stanley, gouverneur général de 1888 à 1893 qui créera plus tard le trophée le plus convoité du monde des sports, la coupe Stanley. Lord Stanley, adoptant pleinement le mode de vie canadien, joue au hockey avec sa famille sur la patinoire de Rideau Hall. C’est là qu’Isobel a été prise en photo dans le feu de l’action, jouant avec d’autres femmes d’Ottawa.

Voici la première photographie de femmes jouant au hockey, vers 1890. Isobel Stanley, habillée de blanc, se trouve à gauche. Photographie : McFarlane, Brian. Tirée de Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey, Toronto, Stoddart Pub, 1995.
Voici la première photographie de femmes jouant au hockey, vers 1890. Isobel Stanley, habillée de blanc, se trouve à gauche. Photographie : McFarlane, Brian. Tirée de Proud Past, Bright Future: One hundred years of Canadian women’s hockey, Toronto, Stoddart Pub, 1995.

De plus, c’est à Ottawa que s’est déroulé le premier match de hockey féminin organisé, comme en témoigne l’Ottawa Citizen du 11 février 1891 : « Hier, deux équipes de femmes se sont disputé un match sur la patinoire Rideau. En voici les membres : 1re équipe – Mlle MacIntosh, capitaine; Mlles Wise, Munro, Ritchie, Camby, Jones et White. 2e équipe – Mlle H. Wise, capitaine; Mlles MacIntosh, Ritchie, McClymont, Burrows et Mme Gordon. La seconde équipe a remporté le match en marquant deux buts à zéro. »

Une première saison

Au début des années 1900, on est passé des jeux improvisés avec des amis aux matchs organisés entre équipes de hockey féminin. Des jeux se disputent sur des patinoires extérieures un peu partout au Canada, y compris au Yukon à l’époque de la ruée vers l’or, dans des villes de toutes tailles. En même temps que ce jeu devient de plus en plus populaire auprès des femmes d’Ottawa, il mobilise aussi les femmes partout ailleurs. Des équipes universitaires ou régionales, uniquement féminines, sont formées, mais la société les acceptent à des degrés divers : à Trois-Rivières, les matchs féminins affichent « pas de spectateurs », tandis que l’équipe de l’Université Queens’s à Kingston est si populaire qu’elle facture un prix d’entrée.

Équipe de hockey de l’Université Queen’s en 1917. Au centre dans la rangée du milieu est assise Charlotte Whitton, qui deviendra la première femme maire d’Ottawa de 1951 à1956 et de 1960 à 1964. Source : Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274
Équipe de hockey de l’Université Queen’s en 1917. Au centre dans la rangée du milieu est assise Charlotte Whitton, qui deviendra la première femme maire d’Ottawa de 1951 à1956 et de 1960 à 1964. Source : Whitton, C. / Library and Archives Canada / PA-127274.

Les couleurs des équipes

Au début du XXe siècle, la mode pour hommes et celle pour femmes forment deux mondes très distincts, et cette réalité se prolonge sur la glace. Les femmes portent de longues jupes et des chandails épais, et elles arborent une tuque ou un bonnet à pompon attaché à leurs cheveux par un peigne. Les jupes entravent leurs mouvements sur la glace, et elles deviennent encore plus encombrantes lorsqu’elles s’imprègnent de glace et de neige. Cependant, les gardiennes de but en tirent parti en cousant dans les ourlets des poids tels que des balles de plomb. Ainsi alourdie, la jupe reste sur la glace et couvre une plus grande surface de filet. Les gardiennes de but portent aussi des protections à la poitrine, au contraire des hommes, et la première gardienne de but qui portera un masque en 1927 est Elizabeth Graham, membre de l’équipe de l’Université Queen’s. Les femmes utilisent des patins pour le hockey, ou elles retirent les pics des patins pour patinage artistique qu’elles sont plus susceptibles de posséder.

Exemples d’uniformes féminins de hockey pendant les premières décennies du XXe siècle. Sources (de gauche à droite) : University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56
Exemples d’uniformes féminins de hockey pendant les premières décennies du XXe siècle. Sources (de gauche à droite) : University of Toronto Archives / B1990-0044/001 (08); William Elisha Maw / Library and Archives Canada / C-014921; Archives of Ontario / C 119-1-0-0-56.

L’Alpha Ladies Club d’Ottawa a été actif à la fin des années 1890. Les membres portaient des chandails blancs avec un blason en forme de « A » rouge sur la poitrine, une jupe rouge et un béret blanc. À la fin de la Première Guerre mondiale, les femmes portent des culottes bouffantes arrivant aux genoux, et à la fin des années 1920, elles adoptent le pantalon de hockey. Sous ce vêtement, certaines joueuses protègent leurs jambes à l’aide de protège-tibias ou elles rembourrent leur pantalon de magazines.

La glace rugueuse

Le chemin du succès n’est jamais lisse, et les joueuses de hockey doivent affronter le refus de l’ensemble de la société comme celui des établissements sportifs. On se préoccupe de leur santé et de leur féminité, et cette attitude apparemment victorienne persiste jusque dans les années 1930, lorsqu’un journaliste écrit : « Le hockey sur glace est un jeu […] qui ne convient aucunement aux femmes, étant donné la chair tendre et molle dont la Nature les a équipées, pour ne rien dire de l’imprudence générale qui arme les membres du genre le plus ardent de bâtons à incliner au dessus de leurs belles têtes sûrement créées à des fins plus ravissantes. » Les médecins donnent aussi leur avis professionnel, déclarant qu’une activité physique aussi vigoureuse est dangereuse pour les organes féminins, en particulier pour l’appareil génital. En plus des torts physiques que causerait le sport, on croit que la mise en échec et la compétitivité cultiveraient des traits de caractère masculins indésirables.

L’équipe de hockey de l’Ottawa Ladies’ College jouant à Liverpool Court en mars 1906. Source : Musée Bytown / P2102.
L’équipe de hockey de l’Ottawa Ladies’ College jouant à Liverpool Court en mars 1906. Source : Musée Bytown / P2102.

Conséquence de ces attitudes sociales, les femmes se heurtent à d’autres obstacles auprès des établissements. Les associations sportives telles que l’Amateur Athletic Union of Canada refuse que les femmes participent à ses activités jusque dans les années 1910. Même dans les jeux de tous les jours, le hockey féminin passe pour inférieur à celui des hommes. En 1938, la journaliste Alexandrine Gibb écrit dans le Toronto Star que « les filles doivent se contenter des restes. Des joueurs novices aux chevronnés, les garçons ont priorité dans toutes les patinoires de la province. »

La ville du hockey

Depuis ces premiers jeux documentés, les femmes d’Ottawa ont adopté le hockey. L’enthousiasme voué à ce sport par les familles de plusieurs gouverneurs généraux le rend à la mode. Après que lord Stanley quitte son poste, les Aberdeen arrivent en 1893. Leurs bals costumés sur glace sont très populaires, mais leurs invitées sont également ravies de participer à un match de hockey. En 1896, les Aberdeen invitent le très populaire Alpha Ladies Club local à jouer contre les membres du Rideau Ladies Hockey à la résidence du gouverneur général. Voici comment un journaliste décrit ce match : « Les deux équipes ont très bien joué et ont surpris des centaines de membres du sexe grave venus au match en pensant y voir plusieurs scènes grotesques et rire de bon cœur. En vérité, avant longtemps, les équipes ont suscité leur sympathie et leur admiration. Les hommes sont devenus très enthousiastes. »

Lord Minto, gouverneur général de 1898 à 1904, patine avec son épouse. Les journaux relatent ainsi la participation de lady Minto à un match de hockey : « Lady Minto a joué en première défense, et la manière dont elle s’est déplacée sur la glace a été une révélation pour les autres joueurs. » Ces mots décrivent une scène différente de celle que montre cette photo, où l’on voit une patineuse tranquille! Source : Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803
Lord Minto, gouverneur général de 1898 à 1904, patine avec son épouse. Les journaux relatent ainsi la participation de lady Minto à un match de hockey : « Lady Minto a joué en première défense, et la manière dont elle s’est déplacée sur la glace a été une révélation pour les autres joueurs. » Ces mots décrivent une scène différente de celle que montre cette photo, où l’on voit une patineuse tranquille! Source : Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033800 Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-033803.

C’est ensuite l’équipe des Alerts d’Ottawa qui gagne le cœur des gens et les championnats. En 1922, ses membres sont les championnes de la Ladies Ontario Hockey Association, et l’année suivante, elles battent l’équipe féminine de North Toronto pour garder leur titre. Leurs victoires, elles les doivent beaucoup à Eva Ault, que décrivent ainsi les journaux : « [elle a marqué] au moins un but dans pratiquement chaque match qu’elle a joué ». En 1924, Eva Ault devient vice-présidente de la Ladies Ontario Hockey Association. Le titre des championnats d’Ontario revient à Ottawa en 1927, lorsque l’Ottawa Rowing Club bat les Toronto Pats.

Cette photo montre Eva Ault, joueuse étoile des Alerts, en 1917. Cette année là, l’équipe, vêtue de noir et d’or avec un bonnet de soie blanche, a joué sur une patinoire de l’avenue Laurier devant 2 000 spectateurs. Source : William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029.
Cette photo montre Eva Ault, joueuse étoile des Alerts, en 1917. Cette année là, l’équipe, vêtue de noir et d’or avec un bonnet de soie blanche, a joué sur une patinoire de l’avenue Laurier devant 2 000 spectateurs. Source : William James Topley/Library and Archives Canada/PA-043029.

À la fin de la décennie, plusieurs ligues féminines se sont formées, mais comme l’a prédit la journaliste Alexandrine Gibb en 1934, « le hockey féminin commence tout juste à devenir un sport de compétition à l’échelle du Canada. Les pionnières du hockey vont aussi affronter des situations inattendues et non éthiques. » Bien que les journaux engagent d’anciennes athlètes pour écrire les chroniques sportives, la plupart des articles sont consacrés aux activités des hommes. Les équipes de hockey masculin continuent d’attirer les foules, de recevoir l’essentiel du financement et d’accéder aux meilleurs moments sur la glace. Mais les femmes persévèrent : en 1998, plus d’un siècle après le premier match disputé à Ottawa, le hockey féminin devient une discipline aux Jeux olympiques. L’héritage de ces femmes qui, les premières, ont envoyé la rondelle se perpétue aujourd’hui parmi les joueuses de hockey d’aujourd’hui qui continuent de chercher à faire reconnaître leurs compétences et leur talent.

Les Alerts d’Ottawa, championnes de l’Ontario et pionnières du hockey féminin. Source : Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130.
Les Alerts d’Ottawa, championnes de l’Ontario et pionnières du hockey féminin. Source : Library and Archives Canada/PA-178130.

Lilia L. est un membre du Conseil de la jeunesse Musée Bytown et étudie l’histoire et la science politique à l’Université d’Ottawa.

Advertisements

One thought on “Breaking the Ice: The brave beginnings of women’s hockey | Briser la glace : Les courageux débuts du hockey féminin

  1. Pingback: Weekly Links: CWHL and NWHL All-Star Games; Aboriginal involvement in hockey; KHL expansion in Europe; and more | Hockey in Society

Comments are closed.